3D Bioprinting human tissues: principles, applications and challenges

3D Bioprinting human tissues: principles, applications and challenges

With a growing demand for life-saving therapies, more sophisticated tissue-engineered constructs and personalised treatments are required in advanced medicine. Exploiting the potential of emerging technologies would improve the patient’s quality of life significantly and in the long-term may reduce the economical burden of healthcare and research costs. 3D bioprinting can potentially make personalised medicine a reality. This state-of-the-art technology has the scope to achieve well-defined biological structures by printing cell-embedded hydrogels or bioinks. Promptly, by means of 3D bioprinting, on-demand functional tissues will be potentially delivered for reconstructive surgery solving the shortage of organ donors.  However, the 3D bioprinting technology is advancing faster than its understanding and therefore, engaging researchers ought to be involved in this movement to help building meaningful impact in human and animal healthcare.  

Albert Ginjaume graduated from UCH-CEU University (Spain) in 2018 with a BSc in Veterinary medicine. In 2018, he moved to Queen Mary University of London where he graduated with an MSc in Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering. He subsequently joined University of Manchester and the Manchester institute of Biotechnology to pursue a PhD focused on the development of advanced bioinks for 3D bioprinting applications.